Creating Rattleheads: A Gift for Me and the Receiver

By

Creating Rattleheads:  A Gift for Me and the Receiver
Creating Rattleheads: A Gift for Me and the Receiver

In the book, The Five Languages of Love, author Gary Chapman lists the following as tokens of love: words of affirmation, quality time, receiving gifts, acts of service and physical touch. He explains how we as human beings react to each of these in varying degrees. While all of these are important, most of us find we respond more towards one than the others.

With that said, here are my thoughts: Regarding words of affirmation, who doesn’t enjoy a nice compliment as opposed to the commercial where the wife says, “Does this dress make me look fat?” and the apathetic, clueless husband responds with, “You betcha!”

Quality time I get as well. Maybe that’s why I love going out to dinner with hubby Russell: No TV blaring, no noisy pots and pans, no messy kitchen. It’s just the two of us with an occasional interruption of, “More tea?” It also gets me out of cooking. Hey, it’s no accident when I tell him how much I’d enjoy sitting at the local café, staring into his baby blue eyes, hearing all about his day.

Performing acts of service is a biggie, and I’ll be the first to say Russell helps out around the house a lot! He does most of the vacuuming, tons of laundry and other assorted honey do’s. That’s probably because with this house there’s no lawn mowing, branch cutting or vine pulling for him to hassle with. When we bought our patio home in Wilmington almost two years ago, he made sure we had a HOA that took care of the lawn (as opposed to the 1/2 acre in Pawleys Island that he maintained). So I guess now house work pales in comparison.

I honestly don’t think anyone in the world (with the exception of my mother) loves back rubs more than I do. But my favorite are foot rubs – physical touch is paramount for me. When I was pregnant with Katie, our youngest, Russell would rub my feet almost every night, then apply witch hazel with a cotton ball. Ahhhhhhhh – so soothing. It was almost a good enough reason to continue birthing babies right up until menopause, but not quite.

Still, all in all, my favorite of these token pleasures is gifts – making them and receiving them. It doesn’t have to be a big thing. My sister, Nancy, is famous for giving magnetic note pads for the refrigerator, always in a girly-girlish style, say, pink-and-brown polka dots. A dear friend in Myrtle Beach is known for taking photos – I saw this happen over and over at our church; and mailing the photo with a sweet note to the subject. Gifts don’t necessarily have to be purchased either. In fact, some of the best ones aren’t. My other sister, Cathy, makes potpourri from her garden flowers and herbs, then fills sachet bags and gives them away. Actually, my entire family at one time or other has worked with their hands to create home made gifts. Simply the thought of someone selecting just the right thing, laboring in love and using their talents and brains is indeed special.

Mom made silk flower arrangements, crocheted afghans (I have a crocheted pineapple-patterned bed skirt she made 25 years ago from tobacco twine), Cabbage patch look-a-like dolls, Barbie clothes, decoupage plaques and ceramics. After Dad sold his shoe stores, he built a humongous wood working shop and began making gifts (I’ve kept an inventory of over 400) for family, friends and friends-of-friends. His largest gift to date was a solid oak seven-piece bedroom suite he made for Kelly, our oldest daughter, when she married Chuck eleven years ago. We’ve all received hope chests, entertainment centers, kitchen tables, beds, baby cradles and even – in our case, a Honduran mahogany shaker table that features a cross-stitched Rainbow Row design (done by Russell) under clear glass. Nancy and I’ve both done cross stitch and crewel embroidery. My brother, Steve, and his wife, Lori, have themselves built a humongous deck and tiki bar that provides a gift of entertainment to friends and family – be it a pig pickin’, an engagement party or a Jimmy Buffett themed get together.

So with all that said, I took a few years’ break from crafting things – with the exception of crafting stories (such as this). But I’d get to “itching” as the Southern expression goes, and I’d crave something that was missing from my life. As I wandered around craft stores, hardware stores (one of my favorite shopping experiences), hobby shops and art studios, I’d wonder both what I’d be good at and what I’d enjoy. Then I remembered my Rattleheads. Before we moved away from Pawleys Island, I created these “classy dolls on a wand” and sold them at Art Works in Litchfield. Linda Ketron was a big supporter; she sold a half dozen or so. But the craft was tedious, and they were so much WORK! Gathering the supplies, finding just the right boa, hair, paint, adornments and even the base to hold the dowel (or wand). And sometimes they were painful – hot glue gun burns notwithstanding. Still, it was something I had to do: I visited various stores to gather my goodies, spread them out on the kitchen table (and bar and china cabinet, etc.) and went to work. One problem was the base: I needed something sturdy but attractive, and Dad came to the rescue with cypress crown molding that is strong and attractive. Here’s the best part: No two Rattleheads are alike, a tiny mistake can be endearing (much like character flaws in people) and each one takes on a personality of its own. So once again, I’m creating gifts that I hope will be cherished. Being back in the art world is the best therapy I know of: It is self expression brought to life. And for me, art is one more thing: A gift from the Creator, interpreted by the artist and given to cherish.

About this writer

  • Creating Rattleheads: A Gift for Me and the Receiver

    In the book, The Five Languages of Love, author Gary Chapman lists the following as tokens of love: words of affirmation, quality time, receiving gifts, acts of service and physical touch. He explains how we as human beings react to each of these in varying degrees. While all of these are important, most of us find we respond more towards one than the others.

    With that said, here are my thoughts: Regarding words of affirmation, who doesn’t enjoy a nice compliment as opposed to the commercial where the wife says, “Does this dress make me look fat?” and the apathetic, clueless husband responds with, “You betcha!”

    Quality time I get as well. Maybe that’s why I love going out to dinner with hubby Russell: No TV blaring, no noisy pots and pans, no messy kitchen. It’s just the two of us with an occasional interruption of, “More tea?” It also gets me out of cooking. Hey, it’s no accident when I tell him how much I’d enjoy sitting at the local café, staring into his baby blue eyes, hearing all about his day.

    Performing acts of service is a biggie, and I’ll be the first to say Russell helps out around the house a lot! He does most of the vacuuming, tons of laundry and other assorted honey do’s. That’s probably because with this house there’s no lawn mowing, branch cutting or vine pulling for him to hassle with. When we bought our patio home in Wilmington almost two years ago, he made sure we had a HOA that took care of the lawn (as opposed to the 1/2 acre in Pawleys Island that he maintained). So I guess now house work pales in comparison.

    I honestly don’t think anyone in the world (with the exception of my mother) loves back rubs more than I do. But my favorite are foot rubs – physical touch is paramount for me. When I was pregnant with Katie, our youngest, Russell would rub my feet almost every night, then apply witch hazel with a cotton ball. Ahhhhhhhh – so soothing. It was almost a good enough reason to continue birthing babies right up until menopause, but not quite.

    Still, all in all, my favorite of these token pleasures is gifts – making them and receiving them. It doesn’t have to be a big thing. My sister, Nancy, is famous for giving magnetic note pads for the refrigerator, always in a girly-girlish style, say, pink-and-brown polka dots. A dear friend in Myrtle Beach is known for taking photos – I saw this happen over and over at our church; and mailing the photo with a sweet note to the subject. Gifts don’t necessarily have to be purchased either. In fact, some of the best ones aren’t. My other sister, Cathy, makes potpourri from her garden flowers and herbs, then fills sachet bags and gives them away. Actually, my entire family at one time or other has worked with their hands to create home made gifts. Simply the thought of someone selecting just the right thing, laboring in love and using their talents and brains is indeed special.

    Mom made silk flower arrangements, crocheted afghans (I have a crocheted pineapple-patterned bed skirt she made 25 years ago from tobacco twine), Cabbage patch look-a-like dolls, Barbie clothes, decoupage plaques and ceramics. After Dad sold his shoe stores, he built a humongous wood working shop and began making gifts (I’ve kept an inventory of over 400) for family, friends and friends-of-friends. His largest gift to date was a solid oak seven-piece bedroom suite he made for Kelly, our oldest daughter, when she married Chuck eleven years ago. We’ve all received hope chests, entertainment centers, kitchen tables, beds, baby cradles and even – in our case, a Honduran mahogany shaker table that features a cross-stitched Rainbow Row design (done by Russell) under clear glass. Nancy and I’ve both done cross stitch and crewel embroidery. My brother, Steve, and his wife, Lori, have themselves built a humongous deck and tiki bar that provides a gift of entertainment to friends and family – be it a pig pickin’, an engagement party or a Jimmy Buffett themed get together.

    So with all that said, I took a few years’ break from crafting things – with the exception of crafting stories (such as this). But I’d get to “itching” as the Southern expression goes, and I’d crave something that was missing from my life. As I wandered around craft stores, hardware stores (one of my favorite shopping experiences), hobby shops and art studios, I’d wonder both what I’d be good at and what I’d enjoy. Then I remembered my Rattleheads. Before we moved away from Pawleys Island, I created these “classy dolls on a wand” and sold them at Art Works in Litchfield. Linda Ketron was a big supporter; she sold a half dozen or so. But the craft was tedious, and they were so much WORK! Gathering the supplies, finding just the right boa, hair, paint, adornments and even the base to hold the dowel (or wand). And sometimes they were painful – hot glue gun burns notwithstanding. Still, it was something I had to do: I visited various stores to gather my goodies, spread them out on the kitchen table (and bar and china cabinet, etc.) and went to work. One problem was the base: I needed something sturdy but attractive, and Dad came to the rescue with cypress crown molding that is strong and attractive. Here’s the best part: No two Rattleheads are alike, a tiny mistake can be endearing (much like character flaws in people) and each one takes on a personality of its own. So once again, I’m creating gifts that I hope will be cherished. Being back in the art world is the best therapy I know of: It is self expression brought to life. And for me, art is one more thing: A gift from the Creator, interpreted by the artist and given to cherish.

You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

Leave your mark with style

Comment in style

Stand out from the crowd and add some flare beside your comment.
Get your free Gravatar today!

Make it personal

avatar versus gravatar Close