The White Wine Society

By

The White Wine Society
The White Wine Society

“Wine is not a beverage. It’s a way of life.” I didn’t write this sentiment but I did buy the cocktail napkin. I also bought “Wine! My favorite dish.” Perhaps you get my drift. I enjoy nothing more than a chilled glass of chardonnay. But I’m not a wine snob. Frankly, I’m just not qualified. I don’t know the difference between the bouquet and the aroma, and the only thing I can tell you about the cork is whether or not I broke it. Yet, for more than a decade now, I’ve been a member of a club I like to call “The White Wine Society.” It’s not what you think. The members don’t wear little white gloves, pearls or frilly hats. There’s no application to complete or references to submit. There are no limits on the number of members. The name might sound exclusive, but in reality, the requirements for membership are few.

Maybe you’re not sure if you’re a member or if you want to be. Don’t worry. It’s easy to determine. Are you in a book club where the wine is as important as the book you’re discussing? I’m not bashing the books, of course, but let’s be real. Hashing over the plot lines and characterizations does not take the three hours you spend on your neighbor’s sofa. If you love book club, not just for the reading, but also for the second glass of wine you sip while spending time with your favorite people, you’re a member. Sometimes belonging to one group can automatically guarantee membership. For example, supper clubs are a given. I mean, think about it. Sure, there’s food, but that’s just to soak up the wine. If you’re in a supper club, you’re a member. Bunco groups are another one. Occasionally there’s playing involved (or so I hear) but ultimately, it comes down to socializing and sipping. If you’re in a Bunco group, you’re a member.

Perhaps you don’t belong to a group like any of those mentioned, and you still aren’t sure if you belong. There are other clues. Are you more interested in attending wine tastings than happy hours? Have you ever seriously considered a vacation in Napa Valley? When you updated the family kitchen, did you spend hours searching the internet for a wine refrigerator with dual chilling features? Do you shop at Costco claiming it’s for the bulk food prices when you’re really loading up on wine? Although to be fair, the two-pound container of lobster spread will complement any white wine you might bring to book club.

There are other times when membership is more a matter of survival.

Have you ever watched your four year old’s swim lesson and cringed as they screamed your name in agony each time they had to put their face in the water? If so, you may have been wondering if it was too early in the day for chardonnay. Maybe you poured a glass when you got home from work because your boss is a pain, deadlines were looming and your new co-worker looks young enough for middle school. As I said, the requirements for membership are few. Strictly speaking, you drink white wine. But even that stipulation is negotiable.

Some members prefer red wine and some like the occasional beer. While women tend to drink more wine than men, gender is not important. Stay-at-home moms, working moms, dads who are moms. Singles, divorcees, widows. Everyone is welcome. Age, however, does seem to come into play. I believe you have to grow into your membership, and there may be a few diversions along the way. In college, you’re likely to drink beer or whatever warm stuff comes out of the keg. In your mid-twenties, you may move on to other drinks like bourbon and coke, particularly after the wedding invitations start rolling in. Nothing says “’til death do us part” like a syrupy sweet highball in a tiny glass, especially when accompanied by a cocktail napkin engraved in silver. That bourbon phase doesn’t last long. At some point, members grow into their preferred beverage, white wine.

For me, this really didn’t happen until after my first child was born.

I found that I began to choose wine more often than not. Sure, I still like an icy beer, especially on the beach. And I do still enjoy the occasional cocktail, but bourbon, gin and scotch are not on my list. A cold vodka drink with lime, however, is very refreshing. Red wine is equally delicious, but I prefer it on cold nights in front of a fire.

Truthfully, it’s on those ordinary days when I’m just plain tired that I’m glad there’s a glass of chardonnay waiting for me on the counter. At other times, such as when my husband is out of town, and I know he’d rather get a root canal than watch a chick flick, I pop in a video and uncork a cold bottle. And then there’s the annual girls’ weekend. Yes, these are the reasons I consider myself a full-fledged member.

This is not something I necessarily aspired to, yet, I find that membership does have its privileges. Wine is always available in restaurants. Friends serve wine at dinner parties and cookouts. Both red and white wine, in moderation, can be beneficial to your health.

And as I already said, I like it. This doesn’t mean I advocate wine over water, or milk or coffee, but if you’re in the mood for something stronger, and you choose wine, you’re probably a member like me. Still, the most important aspect of membership is it’s something you share with good friends and people you love. All across the world, you will find others who feel as you do about wine. Could I live without it? Of course, but why would I want to? I’ve even written my own slogan for a cocktail napkin. “Wine. A glass a day keeps the doctor away!” Cheers!

About this writer

  • The White Wine Society

    “Wine is not a beverage. It’s a way of life.” I didn’t write this sentiment but I did buy the cocktail napkin. I also bought “Wine! My favorite dish.” Perhaps you get my drift. I enjoy nothing more than a chilled glass of chardonnay. But I’m not a wine snob. Frankly, I’m just not qualified. I don’t know the difference between the bouquet and the aroma, and the only thing I can tell you about the cork is whether or not I broke it. Yet, for more than a decade now, I’ve been a member of a club I like to call “The White Wine Society.” It’s not what you think. The members don’t wear little white gloves, pearls or frilly hats. There’s no application to complete or references to submit. There are no limits on the number of members. The name might sound exclusive, but in reality, the requirements for membership are few.

    Maybe you’re not sure if you’re a member or if you want to be. Don’t worry. It’s easy to determine. Are you in a book club where the wine is as important as the book you’re discussing? I’m not bashing the books, of course, but let’s be real. Hashing over the plot lines and characterizations does not take the three hours you spend on your neighbor’s sofa. If you love book club, not just for the reading, but also for the second glass of wine you sip while spending time with your favorite people, you’re a member. Sometimes belonging to one group can automatically guarantee membership. For example, supper clubs are a given. I mean, think about it. Sure, there’s food, but that’s just to soak up the wine. If you’re in a supper club, you’re a member. Bunco groups are another one. Occasionally there’s playing involved (or so I hear) but ultimately, it comes down to socializing and sipping. If you’re in a Bunco group, you’re a member.

    Perhaps you don’t belong to a group like any of those mentioned, and you still aren’t sure if you belong. There are other clues. Are you more interested in attending wine tastings than happy hours? Have you ever seriously considered a vacation in Napa Valley? When you updated the family kitchen, did you spend hours searching the internet for a wine refrigerator with dual chilling features? Do you shop at Costco claiming it’s for the bulk food prices when you’re really loading up on wine? Although to be fair, the two-pound container of lobster spread will complement any white wine you might bring to book club.

    There are other times when membership is more a matter of survival.

    Have you ever watched your four year old’s swim lesson and cringed as they screamed your name in agony each time they had to put their face in the water? If so, you may have been wondering if it was too early in the day for chardonnay. Maybe you poured a glass when you got home from work because your boss is a pain, deadlines were looming and your new co-worker looks young enough for middle school. As I said, the requirements for membership are few. Strictly speaking, you drink white wine. But even that stipulation is negotiable.

    Some members prefer red wine and some like the occasional beer. While women tend to drink more wine than men, gender is not important. Stay-at-home moms, working moms, dads who are moms. Singles, divorcees, widows. Everyone is welcome. Age, however, does seem to come into play. I believe you have to grow into your membership, and there may be a few diversions along the way. In college, you’re likely to drink beer or whatever warm stuff comes out of the keg. In your mid-twenties, you may move on to other drinks like bourbon and coke, particularly after the wedding invitations start rolling in. Nothing says “’til death do us part” like a syrupy sweet highball in a tiny glass, especially when accompanied by a cocktail napkin engraved in silver. That bourbon phase doesn’t last long. At some point, members grow into their preferred beverage, white wine.

    For me, this really didn’t happen until after my first child was born.

    I found that I began to choose wine more often than not. Sure, I still like an icy beer, especially on the beach. And I do still enjoy the occasional cocktail, but bourbon, gin and scotch are not on my list. A cold vodka drink with lime, however, is very refreshing. Red wine is equally delicious, but I prefer it on cold nights in front of a fire.

    Truthfully, it’s on those ordinary days when I’m just plain tired that I’m glad there’s a glass of chardonnay waiting for me on the counter. At other times, such as when my husband is out of town, and I know he’d rather get a root canal than watch a chick flick, I pop in a video and uncork a cold bottle. And then there’s the annual girls’ weekend. Yes, these are the reasons I consider myself a full-fledged member.

    This is not something I necessarily aspired to, yet, I find that membership does have its privileges. Wine is always available in restaurants. Friends serve wine at dinner parties and cookouts. Both red and white wine, in moderation, can be beneficial to your health.

    And as I already said, I like it. This doesn’t mean I advocate wine over water, or milk or coffee, but if you’re in the mood for something stronger, and you choose wine, you’re probably a member like me. Still, the most important aspect of membership is it’s something you share with good friends and people you love. All across the world, you will find others who feel as you do about wine. Could I live without it? Of course, but why would I want to? I’ve even written my own slogan for a cocktail napkin. “Wine. A glass a day keeps the doctor away!” Cheers!

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10 Responses to “The White Wine Society”

  1. Laurie says:

    Funny, Kellie — and so true.

  2. Critter says:

    Loved it! Very entertaining. I think I’ll have a glass.

  3. Dix says:

    I guess I don’t have a drinking problem. Thanks Kelly!

  4. C. Clawson says:

    Funny when your husband forwards your article to me saying ‘right up your alley’. I no longer feel guilty for that cold glass of sanity! Well done Kellie.

  5. Katie Murphy says:

    Kellie – You hit the nail on the head for 20 somethings!! Come join us in San Francisco for a trip to Wine Country. I know nothing either, except where the free tastings are… & our fridge is always full of Costco scubatanks of white wine… probably because I learn from the best, Aunt Kellie!

  6. BR says:

    Kellie….great article….loved it. My wife does indeed love the chardonnay but for me, it was your husband who enhanced my affection for a cold vodka drink with a lime. I think it might have been on one of those out of town trips !

  7. McMillen says:

    Kelly, Please have Dave bring your favorite chardonnay next August for the annual Chowder, Lobster, and Steak feast in Ohio. We will raise a toast to you. Funny article. I think Lori has been a member since our first child.

  8. Danita Sharp says:

    Kelly, Loved your story, you are an amazing writer, and how true, I think all of us gals can relate. Love to you and the family.

  9. Mary Mitchell says:

    Loved this article. When can we see more of Kellie Murphy in print???

  10. Kelly, I so enjoyed this article that I have since shared it with friends. You gave us non-wine snobs a break, and made a chardonnay taste a wee bit better!

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